Measles

The Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services has confirmed a case of measles in a Long Beach resident.

The Health Department is working with the neighboring health jurisdictions of Orange County and Los Angeles County to identify and notify residents of locations the infected individual visited while contagious. Health Department staff are notifying locations in Long Beach the person visited while contagious. Individuals who visited the following Long Beach locations at the times stated below may have been exposed to measles:

Date Location Address Time
4/28/2019 Pizzanista 1837 E 7th St, Long Beach 90813 5:30- 7:00 PM
4/28/2019 Total Wine 7400 Carson Blvd, Long Beach, 90808 6:00- 7:30 PM
4/30/2019 Susan European Dressmaker 3319 E 7th St, Long Beach, 90804 5:00-7:00 PM
5/1/2019 Art du Vin Wine Bar 2027 E 4th St, Long Beach, 90814 8:00-10:00 PM
5/1/2019 Ralph's 2930 E 4th St, Long Beach, 90814 2:00-5:00 PM
5/2/2019 Ralph's 6290 PCH, Long Beach, 90803 3:00- 6:30 PM
5/2/2019 AMC Marina Pacifica 6346 E PCH, Long Beach, 90803 6:00- 10:00 PM
5/3/2019 Broadway Carwash 4000 E Broadway, Long Beach, 90803 11:00-1:00 PM

More information on places this individual visited while contagious can be found at the following sites:

People who were in the location(s) above around the same time as the individual with measles should:

  • Review their vaccination history if they have not previously had measles. Although vaccination now will not prevent infection from this exposure, people who have not had measles or the measles vaccine should talk with a health care provider about receiving Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccination to prevent future infection.
  • Monitor themselves for illness with fever and/or an unexplained rash from 7 days to 21 days after their exposure (the time period when symptoms may develop); if symptoms develop, stay at home and call a health care provider immediately.

Measles is a highly contagious virus that can be spread through coughing and sneezing from an infectious person. Symptoms of measles often begin with fever, runny nose, cough, and red eyes, followed by a rash that begins on the face then spreads all over the body. Since January 2019, individual cases have been confirmed in 19 states throughout the U.S. including California. California has reported two outbreaks of measles associated with traveling to international countries so far. There have been no cases of measles in Long Beach since 2015.

Measles is a vaccine-preventable disease and the best way to protect yourself and your family is by receiving the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. To stay updated with current recommended vaccines for children living in Long Beach please visit our immunization page


Long Beach Data

Measles Vaccination Report 2018-2019 School Year


Press Releases

First Case of Measles Reported in Long Beach - 5/4/19
Public Notice of Possible Measles Exposure - 4/10/19
CDPH Urges Californians Traveling Internationally to be Fully Vaccinated against Measles


Provider Information

Measles Guidance for Long Beach Providers - May 2019
04/19/19: CDPH Measles Recommendations for Healthcare Facilities

Health Alert Measles Exposure at Long Beach Airport
Measles Clinical Guide
Measles Testing Guidelines
CDPH Healthcare Infection Control for Suspect Measles Patients- April 2019
CDPH Immune Globulin for Measles Quicksheet
CDPH Measles Specimen Collection


Measles Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

 
  • WHAT IS MEASLES?

    Measles is a highly contagious and potentially severe disease that causes fever, rash, cough, and red, watery eyes. Measles spreads very easily by air and by direct contact with an infected person.

  • HOW DOES MEASLES SPREAD?

    The virus spreads easily through the air when a sick person coughs or sneezes. The virus can stay in the air for up to two hours, even if the sick person has left the room. You can become infected by being in a room that a sick person was in or by touching objects that they’ve touched.

    Up to 90% of people who have never been vaccinated against or sick with the measles will become infected if they have contact with the virus. A person with measles can spread the disease to others even before they have any symptoms.

  • WHAT ARE SYMPTOMS OF MEASLES?

    Measles can cause:

    • High fever (over 101 °F)
    • Cough
    • Runny nose
    • Red watery eyes
    • A rash that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body
  • WHAT COMPLICATIONS CAN MEASLES CAUSE?

    Measles can cause ear infections and diarrhea. It can also cause serious illness, such as pneumonia, encephalitis (swelling of the brain), and even death. Anyone can suffer complications, however some groups, such as infants and children aged <5 years, adults aged >20 years, pregnant women, and people with weak immune systems due to Leukemia or HIV, are more likely to have serious health problems due to measles.

  • HOW IS MEASLES TREATED?

    There is no treatment for measles. Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms and managing serious health problems that can happen.

  • WHAT CAN YOU DO TO PREVENT MEASLES?

    Getting vaccinated is the best way to keep from getting and spreading measles. The MMR vaccine’s safety and effectiveness records are strong. People should get measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine if they haven’t been vaccinated or don’t know if they have had MMR vaccine before. Kids should be vaccinated at 12-15 months of age and again at 4-6 years of age. Anyone born after 1957 who hasn’t been vaccinated should get their MMR vaccine. Infants between 6 and 12 months old are recommended to get an MMR prior to any international travel. If you’re traveling soon and are unsure whether you are immune to measles or don’t have two documented MMR, contact your doctor.

  • WHERE CAN YOU GO TO GET VACCINATED?

    Call your doctor to get an MMR vaccine, which may be covered by your insurance. You may also be vaccinated at a pharmacy or at a clinic offering no or low-cost vaccinations.

  • WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE MEASLES?

    If you think that you or someone in your family has been exposed to or has measles, call your doctor’s office right away. Tell them that you might have measles before you go, so they can take steps to prevent other patients and staff from being exposed.

  • WHERE CAN I LEARN MORE ABOUT MEASLES?

    California Department of Public Health:
    https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/Pages/Immunization/measles.aspx

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:
    https://www.cdc.gov/measles/


Resources

Measles FAQ:  (English)  (Spanish)  (Tagalog)
Measles Clinical Flyer:  (English)  (Spanish)  (Tagalog)
Measles Travel Flyer:  (English)  (Spanish)  (Tagalog) 


Questions

For questions contact the Epidemiology Department at (562) 570-4302


Last Updated: 5/15/2019